The Self-Sufficiency Standard

with No Comments

How much is enough in Wyoming?

The Self-Sufficiency Standard Defined

The Self-Sufficiency Standard calculates how much income families of various sizes and compositions need to make ends meet at a minimally adequate level without public or private assistance. Use our self-sufficiency calculator to assess the cost of living and wages needed to get by in your county.

Housing, child care, and food account for nearly two-thirds of expenses

16.07.11_kidscount_self-sufficiency-03

  • Housing = $747
  • Child Care = $1,211
  • Food = $805
  • Transportation = $421
  • Health Care = $511
  • Miscellaneous = $369
  • Taxes (Net) = $308

Hourly wage to be self-sufficient varies by county

16.07.11_kidscount_self-sufficiency-05

The median wage has not kept up with increase in the cost of living

16.07.11_kidscount_self-sufficiency-04

Hourly wage to be self-sufficient varies by family type

16.07.11_kidscount_self-sufficiency-06

Getting to Self-Sufficiency

Closing the wage gap between current wages and the Self-Sufficiency Standard requires both reducing costs and raising incomes.

How does the standard compare?

16.07.11_kidscount_self-sufficiency-07

 

How do Wyoming’s jobs stack up?

16.07.11_kidscount_self-sufficiency-08

How do work supports help families meet basic needs?

16.07.11_kidscount_self-sufficiency-09

This figure show how much work supports can reduce a family’s expenses, so they can get on a lower wage until she is able to earn a Self-Sufficiency level wage.

  • A housing voucher reduces costs from $822 to $558 per month (30% of income).
  • Child care assistance reduces child care costs from $919 to $29 per month.
  • Food assistance reduces groceries from $596 to $445 per month.
  • Kid Care CHIP reduces health care costs from $446 to $152 per month.

16.07.11_kidscount_self-sufficiency-10